An Integrative Information Aqueduct to Close the Gaps between Satellite Observation of Water Cycle and Local Sustainable Management of Water Resources

The past decades have seen rapid advancements in space-based monitoring of essential water cycle variables, providing products related to precipitation, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture, often at tens of kilometer scales. Whilst these data effectively characterize water cycle variability at regional to global scales, they are less suitable for sustainable management of local water resources, which needs detailed information to represent the spatial heterogeneity of soil and vegetation. The following questions are critical to effectively exploit information from remotely sensed and in situ Earth observations (EOs): How to downscale the global water cycle products to the local scale using multiple sources and scales of EO data? How to explore and apply the downscaled information at the management level for a better understanding of soil-water-vegetation-energy processes? How can such fine-scale information be used to improve the management of soil and water resources? An integrative information flow (i.e., iAqueduct theoretical framework) is developed to close the gaps between satellite water cycle products and local information necessary for sustainable management of water resources. The integrated iAqueduct framework aims to address the abovementioned scientific questions by combining medium-resolution (10 m–1 km) Copernicus satellite data with high-resolution (cm) unmanned aerial system (UAS) data, in situ observations, analytical- and physical-based models, as well as big-data analytics with machine learning algorithms. This paper provides a general overview of the iAqueduct theoretical framework and introduces some preliminary results.

Concept Diagram

How to cite: Su, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Romano, N.; Manfreda, S.; Francés, F.; Dor, E.B.; Szabó, B.; Vico, G.; Nasta, P.; Zhuang, R.; Francos, N.; Mészáros, J.; Sasso, S.F.D.; Bassiouni, M.; Zhang, L.; Rwasoka, D.T.; Retsios, B.; Yu, L.; Blatchford, M.L.; Mannaerts, C. An Integrative Information Aqueduct to Close the Gaps between Satellite Observation of Water Cycle and Local Sustainable Management of Water Resources. Water 202012, 1495. [pdf]

Quantifying Long-term Land Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture over Tibetan Plateau

It is crucial to monitor the dynamics of soil moisture over the Tibetan Plateau, while considering its important role in understanding the land-atmosphere interactions and their influences on climate systems (e.g., Eastern Asian Summer Monsoon). However, it is very challenging to have both the surface and root zone soil moisture (SSM and RZSM) over this area, especially the study of feedbacks between soil moisture and climate systems requires long-term (e.g., decadal) datasets. In this study, the SSM data from different sources (satellites, land data assimilation, and in-situ measurements) were blended while using triple collocation and least squares method with the constraint of in-situ data climatology. A depth scaling was performed based on the blended SSM product, using Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) matching approach and simulation with Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) model, to estimate the RZSM. The final product is a set of long-term (~10yr) consistent SSM and RZSM product. The inter-comparison with other existing SSM and RZSM products demonstrates the credibility of the data blending procedure used in this study and the reliability of the CDF matching method and SMAR model in deriving the RZSM.

How to cite: Zhuang, R.; Zeng, Y.; Manfreda, S.; Su, Z. Quantifying Long-term Land Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture over Tibetan Plateau. Remote Sens. 202012, 509. [pdf]

Soil Moisture Monitoring in Iran by Implementing Satellite Data into the Root-Zone SMAR Model

Monitoring Surface Soil Moisture (SSM) and Root Zone Soil Moisture (RZSM) dynamics at the regional scale is of fundamental importance to many hydrological and ecological studies. This need becomes even more critical in arid and semi-arid regions, where there are a lack of in situ observations. In this regard, satellite-based Soil Moisture (SM) data is promising due to the temporal resolution of acquisitions and the spatial coverage of observations. Satellite-based SM products are only able to estimate moisture from the soil top layer; however, linking SSM with RZSM would provide valuable information on land surface-atmosphere interactions. In the present study, satellite-based SSM data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) are first compared with the few available SM in situ observations, and are then coupled with the Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) model to estimate RZSM in Iran. The comparison between in situ SM observations and satellite data showed that the SMAP satellite products provide more accurate description of SSM with an average correlation coefficient (R) of 0.55, root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.078 m3 m-3 and a Bias of 0.033 m3 m-3. Thereafter, the SMAP satellite products were coupled with SMAR model, providing a description of the RZSM with performances that are strongly influenced by the misalignment between point and pixel processes measured in the preliminary comparison of SSM data.

How to cite: Gheybi, F., P. Paridad, F. Faridani, A. Farid, A. Pizarro, M. Fiorentino and S. Manfreda, Soil Moisture Monitoring in Iran by Implementing Satellite Data into the Root-Zone SMAR Model, Hydrology 2019, 6, 44 (doi: 10.3390/hydrology6020044), 2019. [pdf]

Emerging earth observing platforms offer new insights into hydrological processes

Data, and its timely delivery, presents one of the major constraints in advancing the hydrological sciences. Traditional monitoring techniques are time consuming, expensive, and discontinuous in space and time. Moreover, field observations are influenced by instrumental degradation and human errors. While providing the foundation upon which much of our hydrological knowledge is based, new observational strategies are required to drive further understanding and insights. Recent advances in earth observation (EO) technologies present a new frontier for hydrologic monitoring and process description.

Figure: UAS derived 3D dense point cloud, (B) mesh model, and (C) tiled model derived from a UAS based survey of an earthen dam next to the village of Pischia (Timisoara, Romania). Such data provide the framework for development of high-resolution flood modeling, urban watershed mapping and civil engineering design and map updating.

How to cite: Manfreda, S., M.F. McCabe. Emerging earth observing platforms offer new insights into hydrological processesHydrolink, 1, 8-9, 2019.  [pdf]

Data Fusion Through Bayesian Methods for Flood Monitoring from Remotely Sensed Data

Producing high-precision flood maps requires integrating and correctly classifying information coming from heterogeneous sources. Methods to perform such integration have to rely on different knowledge bases. A useful tool to perform this task consists in the use of Bayesian methods to assign probabilities to areas being subject to flood phenomena, fusing a priori information and modeling with data coming from radar or optical imagery. In this chapter we review the use of Bayesian networks, an elegant framework to cast probabilistic descriptions of complex systems, applied to flood monitoring from multi-sensor, multi-temporal remotely sensed and ancillary data.

How to cite: Annarita D’Addabbo, Alberto Refice, Domenico Capolongo, Guido Pasquariello and Salvatore Manfreda, Data Fusion Through Bayesian Methods for Flood Monitoring from Remotely Sensed Data, Springer International Publishing AG 2018, Pages 181 – 208, (doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-63959-8_8), 2018. [pdf]

Calibration of a parsimonious distributed ecohydrological daily model in a data-scarce basin by exclusively using the spatio-temporal variation of NDVI

Ecohydrological modeling studies in developing countries, such as sub-Saharan Africa, often face the problem of extensive parametrical requirements and limited available data. Satellite remote sensing data may be able to fill this gap, but require novel methodologies to exploit their spatio-temporal information that could potentially be incorporated into model calibration and validation frameworks.
The present study tackles this problem by suggesting an automatic calibration procedure, based on the empirical orthogonal function, for distributed ecohydrological daily models. The procedure is tested with the support of remote sensing data in a data-scarce environment – the upper Ewaso Ngiro river basin in Kenya. In the present application, the TETIS-VEG model is calibrated using only
NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) data derived from MODIS. The results demonstrate that (1) satellite data of vegetation dynamics can be used to calibrate and validate ecohydrological models in water-controlled and data-scarce regions, (2) the model calibrated using only satellite data is able to reproduce both the spatio-temporal vegetation dynamics and the observed discharge at the outlet and (3) the proposed automatic calibration methodology works satisfactorily and it allows for a straightforward incorporation of spatio-temporal data into the calibration and validation framework of a model.

How to cite: Guiomar Ruiz-Pérez, Julian Koch, Salvatore Manfreda, Kelly Caylor and Félix Francés, Calibration of a parsimonious distributed ecohydrological daily model in a data-scarce basin by exclusively using the spatio-temporal variation of NDVIHydrology and Earth System Sciences (doi: 10.5194/hess-21-6235-2017) 2017. [pdf]

A modified version of the SMAR model for estimating root-zone soil moisture from time-series of surface soil moisture

Root-zone soil moisture at the regional scale has always been a missing element of the hydrological cycle. Knowing its value could be a great help in estimating evapotranspiration, erosion, runoff, permeability, irrigation needs, etc. The recently developed Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) can relate the surface soil moisture to the moisture content of deeper layers using a physically-based formulation. Previous studies have proved the effectiveness of SMAR in estimating root-zone soil moisture, yet there is still room for improvement in its application. For example, the soil water loss function (i.e. deep percolation and evapotranspiration), assumed to be a linear function in the SMAR model, may produce approximations in the estimation of water losses in the second soil layer. This problem becomes more critical in soils with finer textures. In this regard, the soil moisture profile data from two research sites (AMMA and SCAN) were investigated. The results showed that after a rainfall event, soil water losses decrease following a power pattern until they reach a minimum steady state. This knowledge was used to modify SMAR. In particular, SMAR was modified (MSMAR) by introducing a non-linear soil water loss function that allowed for improved estimates of root zone soil moisture.

How to cite: Faridani, F., A. Farid, H. Ansari, S. Manfreda, A modified version of the SMAR model for estimating root-zone soil moisture from time series of surface soil moistureWater SA, Vol. 43 No. 3 July 2017 (doi: 10.4314/wsa.v43i3.14), 2017.  [pdf]

Estimating spatial and temporal variation of root zone soil moisture across a temperate forested catchment with remote sensing data and simple hydrologic models

Satellite-based near-surface (0–2 cm) soil moisture estimates have global coverage, but do not capture variations of soil moisture in the root zone (up to 100 cm depth) and may be biased with respect to ground-based soil moisture measurements. Here, we present an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) hydrologic data assimilation system that predicts bias in satellite soil moisture data to support the physically based Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) infiltration model, which estimates root zone soil moisture with satellite soil moisture data. The SMAR-EnKF model estimates a regional-scale bias parameter using available in situ data. The regional bias parameter is added to satellite soil moisture retrievals before their use in the SMAR model, and the bias parameter is updated continuously over time with the EnKF algorithm. In this study, the SMAR-EnKF assimilates in situ soil moisture at 43 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) monitoring locations across the conterminous U.S. Multivariate regression models are developed to estimate SMAR parameters using soil physical properties and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) evapotranspiration data product as covariates. SMAR-EnKF root zone soil moisture predictions are in relatively close agreement with in situ observations when using optimal model parameters, with root mean square errors averaging 0.051 [cm3 cm−3] (standard error, s.e. = 0.005). The average root mean square error associated with a 20-fold cross-validation analysis with permuted SMAR parameter regression models increases moderately (0.082 [cm3 cm−3], s.e. = 0.004). The expected regional-scale satellite correction bias is negative in four out of six ecoregions studied (mean = −0.12 [-], s.e. = 0.002), excluding the Great Plains and Eastern Temperate Forests (0.053 [-], s.e. = 0.001). With its capability of estimating regional-scale satellite bias, the SMAR-EnKF system can predict root zone soil moisture over broad extents and has applications in drought predictions and other operational hydrologic modeling purposes.

How to cite: Baldwin, D., Manfreda, S., Keller, K., and Smithwick, E.A.H., Predicting root zone soil moisture with soil properties and satellite near-surface moisture data at locations across the United StatesJournal of Hydrology, 546, 393-404, (doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.01.020), 2017.  [pdf]

Estimation of the Root-Zone Soil Moisture Using Passive Microwave Remote Sensing and SMAR Model

Estimation of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) at regional scales is a critical issue in surface hydrology that could be a great help for estimating evapotranspiration, erosion, runoff, and irrigation requirements, etc. A significant number of satellites [soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS), special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I), advanced microwave scanning radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), tropical rainfall measuring mission/microwave imager (TRMM/TMI), etc.] retrieve surface soil moisture (SSM) using passive microwave remote sensing. This information can be used to derive RZSM using a new mathematical filter. In particular, the recently developed soil moisture analytical relationship (SMAR) can relate the surface soil moisture to the moisture of deeper layer using a relationship derived from a soil water balance equation where infiltration is estimated based on the relative fluctuations of soil moisture in the surface soil layer. In the present paper, the SMAR model is tested on two research databases in Africa and North America [African monsoon multidisciplinary analysis (AMMA) and soil climate analysis network (SCAN), respectively], where field measurements at different depths are available. Furthermore, the TRMM/ TMI Satellite is selected to retrieve the satellite SSM data of the studied regions using the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM). Both remotely sensed SSM and field measurements are used within the SMAR model to explore their ability in reproducing the RZSM and also to explore the existing difference in model parameterization moving from one dataset to the other. The SMAR model is applied using three different schemes: (1) with parameters calibrated using surface field measurements, (2) with parameters calibrated using remotely sensed SSM as input, and finally (3) using the remotely sensed SSM with the same parameters calibrated in Scheme 1. In all cases, SMAR parameters have been calibrated using a genetic algorithm optimizing the root-mean square error (RMSE) between SMAR prediction and measured RZSM. The results show that remotely sensed data may be coupled with the SMAR model to provide a good description of RZSM dynamics, but it requires a specific parameterization respect to Scheme 1. Nevertheless, it is surprising to observe that two of the four parameters of the model related to the soil texture are relatively stable moving from remote-sensed to field data.

How to cite: Farid Faridani, Alireza Farid, Hossein Ansari and Salvatore Manfreda, Estimation of the Root-Zone Soil Moisture Using Passive Microwave Remote Sensing and SMAR Model, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering (doi: 10.1061/(ASCE) IR.1943-4774.0001115), 2016. [pdf]  

A Bayesian Network for Flood Detection Combining SAR Imagery and Ancillary Data

Accurate flood mapping is important for both planning activities during emergencies and as a support for the successive assessment of damaged areas. A valuable information source for such a procedure can be remote sensing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. However, flood scenarios are typical examples of complex situations in which different factors have to be considered to provide accurate and robust interpretation of the situation on the ground. For this reason, a data fusion approach of remote sensing data with ancillary information can be particularly useful. In this paper, a Bayesian network is proposed to integrate remotely sensed data, such as multitemporal SAR intensity images and interferometric-SAR coherence data, with geomorphic and other ground information. The methodology is tested on a case study regarding a flood that occurred in the Basilicata region (Italy) on December 2013, monitored using a time series of COSMO-SkyMed data. It is shown that the synergetic use of different information layers can help to detect more precisely the areas affected by the flood, reducing false alarms and missed identifications which may affect algorithms based on data from a single source. The produced flood maps are compared to data obtained independently from the analysis of optical images; the comparison indicates that the proposed methodology is able to reliably follow the temporal evolution of the phenomenon, assigning high probability to areas most likely to be flooded, in spite of their heterogeneous temporal SAR/InSAR signatures, reaching
accuracies of up to 89%.

How to cite: ’Addabbo, A., A. Refice, G. Pasquariello, F. Lovergine, D. Capolongo and S. Manfreda, A Bayesian Network for Flood Detection Combining SAR Imagery and Ancillary DataIEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 54(6), 3612 -3625, (doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2016.2520487), 2016.  [pdf]